Are you ruled by The Emperor or The General?

Are you one of those people whose mind is always full? You have plan A and then you have plan B just in case A doesn’t work out. You are such a great thinker…all your energy goes into thinking. At times it is exhausting, and there is no space in your mind for rest or stillness.

Even the language you use reflects this great power to think your way out of any situation. You tend to say ‘I think’ or ‘I know’ rather than ‘I feel’ or ‘I sense’. You are a doer – you can make anything happen and you can make it happen fast. You more than likely experience a sense of frustration if things don’t happen quickly enough for your liking.

You can be irritated if others slow things down and get up in their emotional response. You like to approach things with your logical linear thinking style and others can sometimes find that very direct and maybe even intimidating. That’s not your intent – you just want to get on and make the situation better. You can be a warrior; an agent for positive change.

Sometimes you can be a bit judgemental. It’s not that you mean to judge people but your mind works at such a speed that you may have summed someone up very quickly. And you may well be right, but there may also be occasions when with a little more time, you see a different aspect of that person and you need to modify your original character assessment.

The Chinese call the mind The General. We all need The General – at times we need protection; at times we need rules and at times we need this focus and discipline. Someone with this busy mind has a very powerful General indeed.

The Chinese refer to the Heart as The Emperor. The heart is where our consciousness resides. When we come from the heart, with The Emperor, there is a sense of majesty, of tradition, of richness and beauty. We all also need The Emperor, so it becomes about whom we give our power to. Do we want our life and decisions to be ruled by The General or do we want to be ruled by The Emperor?

Do we want to live dominated by rules and regulations or by richness and beauty? The General can be very powerful and some of us can lose our connection to our heart without even realising. We are so busy doing, that we forget to feel.

What to do if this feels like you?

Well anything that you can do to allow even a small space into your busy mind can help. Make a list so you don’t need to hold onto those things in your mind any longer. Physical exercise is a healthy way for The General to release any built up frustration or anger.

A walk in nature will also soothe The General and promote some stillness into his mind. The power of deep diaphragmatic breathing can never be overstated, so taking a few deep breaths as you wait at a red light can be a great habit to adopt. This signals the body that you are safe and also allows a moment of respite from all those thoughts.

Change is powerful when it is subtle and also imperceptible. The new way is absorbed before the amygdala (the part of the brain that processes emotions) has a chance to question or reject the new way. By creating that small space in your mind, you allow your energy to come into your heart and give the ultimate power to The Emperor.

Chinese Face Reading

Ancient Chinese medicine dates back over 3000 years. Originally the ancient medicine man worked for The Emperor and cared for the Empress and the Emperor’s concubines. But the medicine man was not allowed to touch the Emperor’s women. So originally face reading became a valuable diagnostic tool and in some practices is still used in this way.

The Emperor’s women had a statue, and when they saw the medicine man they would point to where they felt unwell on the statue and the medicine man would then look – but NOT touch – and see what the patterns of her face could tell him about diseases she would be more likely to experience.

So for many, many years the medicine men had studied patterns. They studied patterns of nature, the seasons, the life cycle; they also studied patterns of disease. They studied patterns of everything.

They noticed that people with certain diseases had certain types of faces. For example, people with particular diseases had a particular shape to their face and a key look to their features.

They looked at size, shape and position of features on each person’s face.

Not only did certain faces show patterns with certain diseases, but those same faces also displayed certain behavioural patterns and emotional patterns. There were gifts and challenges that went with each face type.

The ancient Chinese named these types according to The Five Elements because it was a universal language that could be understood equally by the rich and the poor people. It was the language of nature and metaphors that could offer layers of richness and meaning.

So there was The Water person (Kidney & Bladder), The Wood person (Liver & Gall Bladder), The Fire person (Heart & Small Intestine), The Earth person (Stomach & Spleen) & finally the Metal person (Lung & Skin).

These personality types also linked to the following emotional triggers; Water links to fear, Wood links to anger, Fire links to rejection, Earth links to worry and Metal links to grief.

Chinese face reading, as well as being a diagnostic tool, also became a personality profiling tool; a psychological branch of Chinese medicine if you like. Just as today we use profiles such as Myer Briggs or DISC profiling, we can also look at someone’s face to understand what behavioural and emotional patterns may be in their life. It is not fortune telling nor is it a form of psychic reading but rather the eastern wisdom of studying patterns. It comes from a place of compassion, recognising each individual’s perfect design.  Every quality is perfect when it is in balance, but too much or too little of any quality can allow that quality to show it’s shadow.

Everyone’s design is perfect for them and when any quality displays its shadow it is about reducing the temporary ‘excess’ or ‘depletion’ of that quality to bring it back into the range that serves them.

The Chinese say that our elements are in balance when we come into this world and they are in balance when we leave this world, but the rest of the time we are all seeking to ride that wave and maintain our balance. So at any one time there may be an element speaking to us to seek some extra care. It may speak to us through physical conditions or it may speak to us through things that happen in our life, or patterns that we may get tripped up by.

There are many layers to The Five Elements and whilst the study of The Five Elements can be a lifelong journey, much insight can also be gained by just dipping your toe into this beautiful eastern philosophy.

Introduction to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)

Posted by Hugh Hayward – Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioner and Acupuncturist 

I am writing this article because I figured that there must be a number of people who shared the same confusion I had when first exposed to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). I am aware that it works, but how does it work?

The conventional use of medical lingo is not available in TCM and everything has to be translated for those who can’t just accept the shrugging off of questions by ancient gurus time and time again. “It is as it is, don’t complicate things with an explanation”. One part of my brain can deal with this. The other part cannot.

When I am receiving a treatment and putting my time and funds into that therapy, I like to understand it as best as anyone can without being obsessive, and I expect that our patients probably feel the same way. This is one aspect of holistic medicine which separates us from western medicine. The practitioner is the educator and the patient is also the student.

Thankfully, when you get your head around TCM, it is far simpler than most medical systems and when you start to see life in light of this, the subtle aspects of your own health and others around you become obvious. This is ideal in preventative medicine because it pays to know the signs. Why wait until you are crippled by some illness to receive the treatment? TCM is based on the Tao (or Dao) and the Tao is all encompassing. It is not something you receive when you go to the hospital – it is a way of life. People treat wellbeing as something to cross off their list, but being is an expression of existence. Only a sick person would choose to exist any other way than in wellness.

TCM is one of the oldest healing systems on the planet.

The TCM Theoretical Diagnostic Construct

The best way, I think, to view Chinese Medicine is as a theoretical diagnostic construct. It began with herbal medicine, moxibustion and qi gong (a form of exercise which promotes wellbeing) before acupuncture needles or even acupuncture points were ever used. They started with the knowledge of ‘qi’ and an understanding of channel pathways on the body – that when manipulated with massage and heat would give a therapeutic effect. It is my opinion that TCM as we know it today is the result of a meticulous system of trial and error. The medicine came before the explanation, and the results came before the research and thus an ideology was born to aid diagnosis and treatment. Acupuncture points and meridians then evolved with this set of guidelines as a basis and continues to develop today.

To appease the analytical mind, and to create a catalogue of symptoms and indications, a few ideas were employed.

The theory of yin and yang and the origin of the Tao.

The theory of the Tao is not to be mistaken with the religious following of Taoism. Taoist philosophy and religious beliefs are thought to have originated much later, as collaborated from ancient literature and teachings by the renowned Lao Tzu.

Fu Hsi, while never staking a claim in the origination of the Tao, was around much earlier than Lao Tzu. In any case, wondering where the Tao came from is as pointless as wondering about the birth of the cosmos. The Tao, being all encompassing, does not have an origin. It is a description of the reality of change and the balance of nature in all aspects of existence. The where, how, why and when is inconsequential to the Tao. We have a habit in trying to quantify everything in order to make sense of it. The theory of yin and yang helps us to grasp what is infinite in nature.

Yin and yang is a symbol of opposites – you can not have something without the other side balancing.

Yin and yang is a symbol of the concept of balance and the duality of existence. There is a little bit of something in everything else. The light of day and the darkness of night can only be quantified by their relative comparison. They only exist in our minds because of the other. This basic concept can be realised in every aspect of life. Everything is subject to change and thus everything is bound to become balanced. For example, night and day, substance and mechanism, stasis and movement, rest and work, passivity and aggression, cold and hot, empty and full, solid and hollow: all can be compared against their yin and yang counterpart.

The human body is bound by the concept of yin and yang and it is used to diagnose and treat disease in allowing the practitioner to work towards the ultimate balance of homeostasis.

What is Qi?

The concept of qi in Chinese medicine is rarely discussed but its importance lies in the core of the therapy and most patients don’t even know of its existence. Many modern TCM practitioners don’t even give it recognition beyond its symbology. Qi is often regarded as diagnostic terminology. It has become a name given to a specific pathology. Blood follows the qi, less qi is weakness and more qi is strength. This definition is watered down. It sets a limit for something which is not quantifiable and aims to measure it.

Qi is in everything. Yin and yang and the Tao are all forms of qi. Qi is not energy in the sense that we know it. When we think of energy, we think of a substance that can be spent and used like currency, when it is actually only ever redirected or converted, and like qi, neither can be destroyed. Energy is measured in force, heat and charge but now we know that it exists in all things and even in those that would appear to be stagnant. Magnetic, thermal and gravitational forces exist all around us, but we are in the habit of not feeling this.

Similar to quantum theory, qi exists as the expression of life force, but not just in all things living, but in patterns of vibrational changes which no space or matter is devoid. Electrons shift and bounce between molecules in a seemingly stagnant or solid object, while the core molecular recipe ripples outwards, creating the forms which we perceive.

This is significant in every aspect of existence and we use it in Chinese medicine. In recognising the manifestation of a microcosm, the practitioner is able to see into the body and treat the whole body macrocosm.

TCM as we know it today

The theory of Chinese medicine is becoming lost in the facts. In evolving with the modern world of research and evidence based medicine, TCM now has to comply or become lumped into the category of quackery. The evidence is there! TCM has been used to effectively treat disease for ages. While the science based advancement of acupuncture in the west benefits its exposure, many believe that this movement is a movement away from the Tao. Research based medicine is designed to gauge efficacy when compared with a placebo or a control. Comparing something that we are trying to understand (TCM), to something that we don’t understand (placebo) doesn’t have the clearest results.

The issue is that research has been structured like this based on the principle of western conventional ideologies and the two medicines could not be more different in their approach. When we apply an ancient medicine in the West, the danger is in adapting it to suit us. So instead, we need to adapt to suit the medicine.

So, the answer is, we don’t know how it works! We know what it does and we have a collection of theories about how and why, but more research needs to be applied to the mechanism of acupuncture when used in line with TCM theory, rather than efficacy and point prescription. We are taking something that when used as a whole is complete, and separating it into tiny pieces to be looked at under a microscope, all the while forgetting to see the big picture.

What diseases are your emotions connected to?

Every day we hear about how a nutrient or food leads to a certain disease, or how a chemical is linked to cancer. But have you ever stopped to wonder how your emotions affect your health? Each of us go through a wide range of emotions each day, week and month. Anger, hatred, worry, depression, uneasiness, anxiety, depression, fear, joy, happiness, excitement – these are just a handful of the emotions that we can experience throughout our lives. We all know that negative emotions don’t make us feel good, but what if they could also make us sick?

Interestingly, researchers have asked themselves the same question and the results might surprise you. Dr. Don Colbert quotes some of these studies in his books, which have pointed to the following facts:

  • Anger and hostility – connected to high blood pressure and heart disease
  • Resentment, un-forgiveness, self-hatred – connected to autoimmune disorders, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), lupus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Anxiety – connected to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), mitral valve prolapse, heart palpitations
  • Repressed anger – tension headaches, migraines, chronic back pain, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems, fibromyalgia

You’d think that an emotion was just something that happened in your head, but really it can affect your entire body on both a chemical and energetic level.

A few of the more interesting studies on emotions and health have been:

  • A Harvard study of 1,623 heart attack survivors found that anger that was brought on by emotional conflicts doubled the risk of subsequent heart attacks, compared to those that remained calm.
  • A 10 year study found that people who could not manage their emotional stress had a 40 percent higher mortality rate than non-stressed people.
  • A heart disease study conducted at the Mayo clinic found that psychological stress was the strongest predictor of future cardiac events, including heart failure, cardiac arrest and heart related death.

There are numerous accounts of emotions affecting our health. We have seen this in our practice, where quite often emotional disharmony is the underlying cause for people’s symptoms.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), emotions are an integral part of the diagnosis and treatment of a condition. It is thought that anger affects the liver, fear affects the kidneys and grief affects the lungs. We commonly observe that people’s asthma flares after the death of a loved one, and that people are more prone to urinary tract infections when they are worried or fearful. Although this might seem a little woo-woo, there are countless accounts of people that have come to us for emotional healing, only for their physical symptoms to resolve.

There is a lot you can do to help work through and release emotions that are holding you back.

The first part of dealing with emotional imbalance is to observe it. We are taught to suppress our emotions, not to listen to them, as we should. Not only should we be in check with our emotional state, but also we can use our emotions as a sign post to tell us when we need some help.

Help is available in many forms: from meditation and talking to friends, to seeing a therapist that can help you uncover and deal with underlying emotions. At Brisbane Natural Health, we offer hypnotherapy, holographic kinetics, body talk and energetic healing to help people to resolve emotional wounds so that they can be the happiest version of themselves. We highly recommend a visit if you feel that emotions are affecting you on a daily basis. It is very freeing to be able to go day to day without the burden of anxiety, worry, depression or resentment. And of course we now know that it will prevent disease later on down the track.

Need an appointment? Call us on 07 3367 0337 and we’ll help you get back on track. 

 

 

 

 

 

Does acupuncture hurt?

Video transcript:

In this video I’m going to be answering the question – Does acupuncture hurt?

Hi, I’m Katherine Maslen and I am the founder of Brisbane Natural Health. In this video I’m going to answer a question that we get asked all the time, which is – Does acupuncture hurt?

If you haven’t had acupuncture before, of course you’re going to conjure up images of needles in the skin and pain. But really acupuncture is relatively pain-free and actually is quite relaxing and quite a nice experience. When people come out of our acupuncture rooms often they feel quite airy and relaxed and chilled out, it is quite a relaxing process so it’s nothing really to be afraid of.

So the first thing to mention is that acupuncture needles are itty itty-bitty, they are very small, they are very fine, they are nothing like the needle you would have a blood test with, they are not thick at all.

So quite often as the acupuncturist inserts the needle you may not feel anything at all or maybe just a little pinch, kind of a little pinch of the skin. So generally acupuncture is relatively pain-free.

And the acupuncturist may use specific techniques to stimulate the point of the needle but it’s very, very low discomfort. It’s very rare that the session would be painful or cause significant discomfort. So what our acupuncturists actually do is set you up with some needles, put some nice music on, it’s quite a relaxing process. Then once they have all of the needles set up and you’re nice and comfortable, they would actually leave you to ‘cook’ for a little bit and leave you to chill out.

What we do is pop a little buzzer in your hand in case you move the wrong way or you are feeling a little uncomfortable so our acupuncturist can actually come back in and adjust the needles and make you a little bit more comfortable. So it really is a relaxing process, it’s not scary at all and our acupuncturists will always be asking for feedback from you – is it comfortable? Is there anything else we can do to make it a better experience for you?

So if you’re thinking of trying acupuncture, don’t be afraid. Give it a go, it’s quite relaxing. And if you do want to make an appointment, call our team on 07 3367 0337. If you have any questions or you want to chat to our acupuncturists more about it, email us. The email is info@Brisbanenaturalhealth.com.au.

I am Katherine Maslen, I am the founder of Brisbane Natural Health, thanks for joining me. Please contact us if you have any other questions.

To make an appointment with our acupuncturists, call us on 07 3367 0337 or book online now by clicking on the booking button.

 

 

 

 

 

Acupuncture in Brisbane

Experienced Brisbane Acupuncturists That Address Your Whole Health.

At Brisbane Natural Health our acupuncture team’s number one priority is to leave you feeling relaxed and in a better state than when you came in. With experience in fertility, gut health, anxiety, moods and pain, our acupuncturists will help your body get back to how it’s meant to be. 

If you haven’t tried acupuncture you don’t know what you’re missing. If you have then we guess that’s why you’re here!

So how exactly does acupuncture work? Well acupuncture is one of the oldest healing systems on earth, originating in China thousands of years ago. It works by stimulating your meridians and particular points on the body with fine needles to stimulate your innate healing response and supporting your body to come back into balance.

The techniques used aim to address the cause of your illness, alleviating symptoms and assisting your whole body to heal naturally.

What can acupuncture help with?

Because acupuncture works holistically on the body, it can help with a wide range of issues. At our clinic we commonly help patients that present with issues with their digestion, stress, sleep, hormones, skin, moods and fatigue. Acupuncture has been traditionally used for thousands of years to treat hundreds of different ailments.

The evidence behind the use of acupuncture is mounting. The Acupuncture Evidence Project, which was conducted in 2017, found that acupuncture had evidence of effectiveness in 117 conditions, with stronger evidence for some conditions over others. The review found there to be strong evidence for acupuncture in the treatment of allergic rhinitis (hayfever), chronic lower back pain, headaches, knee osteoarthritis, migraines and postoperative nausea and pain.

There was also moderate evidence for the use of acupuncture in many conditions, including acute lower back pain, anxiety, asthma, pelvic or back pain during pregnancy, constipation, depression (with meds), hypertension (with meds), insomnia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), labour pain, menopausal hot flushes, neck pain, PTSD, restless leg syndrome, schizophrenia (with meds), sciatica, shoulder pain, smoking cessation, and TMJ (jaw) pain.

Another area well researched for acupuncture is it’s use in infertility and IVF. This study shows that acupuncture in conjunction with IVF can improve success rates for example. For more on acupuncture in fertility and IVF, click here.

If you’re curious as to whether we have experience in treating your specific issue at our Brisbane clinic, call us on 07 3367 0337 and ask. You can even book a complimentary call with our acupuncturist to chat about your specific issue and see what might be needed.

Does acupuncture hurt?

There are many different types of acupuncture – ranging from relaxing to ouchy-ouchy. At Brisbane Natural Health we want you to leave feeling like you’re walking on a cloud, so we choose to provide gentle acupuncture only. Our acupuncturist Angela Marshall has advanced training in Japanese Kiiko Matsumoto Style (KMS) acupuncture. KMS is very effective, yet gentle.Learn more about our Japanese style of acupuncture here.

Vaughn Ryan uses a modern form of the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) style of acupuncture, which uses very fine needles and a gentle technique – so pain is very rare.

Our patients leave the acupuncture room with what we endearingly call call ‘acupuncture face’ – that hazy blissed out look that shows they’ve just been taken to the relaxation zone.

Discover

At your initial appointment, our acupuncturist Angela will use Traditional Japanese diagnostic techniques to assess your health. She may look at your tongue or feel your pulse and touch areas of your body to look for tightness and tenderness, which will guide her treatment. She is looking for dysfunction and blockages in your energy pathways or Qi (Chi), that may be causing illness.

Vaughn uses a similar technique, however he is a specialist in the ancient art of pulse diagnosis, and uses this to guide his acupuncture point selection along with your current symptoms.

Renew

The acupuncture treatment will help your body to balance, right there on the table but also for some time afterwards. It is very common for our clients to notice changes right away on the table, even before they have left the clinic. As you begin your treatment process the body begins to renew and regenerate, and your symptoms begin to reduce.

Arrive

Get back to where you want to be. Resolve or manage your issue so you can live a life that you love.

Our clients visit us from north, south and central Brisbane – so don’t be shy!

Our clinic is located in Milton, just a short drive from Paddington, Red Hill, Toowong, Indooroopilly, Brisbane city, Kelvin Grove and many other inner city Brisbane locations.  The Milton train station is right across the road and there is a bus stop right out front. Treat yourself to an hour of relaxation and renewal – book your initial appointment today.

Call our Milton clinic to find out more

Call us on 07 3367 0337 or click the online booking button to make an appointment with an acupuncturist at Brisbane Natural Health and start feeling great again!

Appointments are available 6 days –  Weekdays 8am – 7pm and Saturdays 8am – 2pm


Watch our client story video to see how 3 of our clients – Tessa, Tammy and Sam went through their wellness journey with us.